6th CSD Annual Conference on
Sustainable Development 2023

Unpacking Sustainability, Resilience and Equity

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28 to 30 October  2023, ULAB Permanent Campus

6th CSD Annual Conference on
Sustainable Development 2023

Unpacking Sustainability, Resilience and Equity

26 to 28 October  2023, ULAB Permanent Campus

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Thematic Streams

Advisory Board

Prof. Imran Rahman

Vice Chancellor

Samiya A Selim, PhD

Professor & Director, Center for Sustainable Development (CSD)

Dr. Haseeb Irfanullah

Visiting Research Fellow, Center for Sustainable Development(CSD)

Dr. Saleemul Huq

Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD)

René Véron

Professor, Institute of Geography and Sustainability, University of Lausanne

Prateep Kumar Nayak PhD

Professor, School of Environment, Enterprise and Development, University of Waterloo

Kate Barnighausen

School of Public Health, Master of Science, University of the Witwatersrand

Jenia Mukherjee

Assistant Professor, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur

Emilie Crémin

Post-Doctoral Research Associate, School of Social & Environmental Sustainability, University of Glasgow

Dr. Marion Glaser

Social Scientist, Leader of Social-Ecological Systems (SES) Analysis , Leibniz Centerfor Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT)

Event Schedule

10:00-10:30

Registration

10:30-11:30

Inaugural Ceremony

Let's Not Re-Invent the Wheel - Connect, Complement, Collaborate

11:45-1:15

Advancing the Discussion on Financing for Loss and Damage

 

11:45-1:15

Industry Innovation Supported by Renewable Energy and Artificial Intelligence

1:15-2:15

Lunch

2:15-3:30

Part 1: Nexus Between Poverty, Climate Change, Health, and Mental Health

 

3:45 - 5:00

Part 2: Nexus Between Poverty, Climate Change, Health, and Mental Health

09:30-10:00

Registration

10:00-11:30

Blue Growth and Blue Justice

11:45- 1:15

V2V Session I - Transitions and pathways in small-scale fisheries vulnerability to viability

1:15- 2:00

Lunch

2:00 - 3:30

V2V Session II - Transitions and pathways in small-scale fisheries vulnerability to viability

3:45- 5:00

Transboundary Exploration - Bangladesh-India Sundarban Region Cooperation Initiative

09:30-11:30

Mainstreaming Sustainability Education: Empowering Future Change-Makers

11:45-01:00

Adapting Climate Change Education, Skills, and Sustainability for Advancing Locally-Led Solutions

11:30-1:00

Frame by Frame: SDGs in Focus

 

11:30-01:00

WWW Flood Green Guide

1:15-02:00

Lunch

10:00 – 10:30

Registration

11:30-11:45

Tea Break

11:45-1:15

The world has crossed the critical threshold into what Dr. Saleemul Huq has called “the era of loss and damage,” and what the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres calls the era of climate boiling.
Loss and damage suffered due to increasing changes in our climate is expected to reach new heights. Hence creating a loss and damage fund is of utmost importance for the communities and countries that need it the most. Establishing a loss and damage fund has, however, been very challenging. Less than 100 days left before COP 28 begins in Dubai.
The Transitional Committee set up by the UNFCCC is tasked with coming up with ways to establish a loss and damage fund. This session will look into other creative methods that can be used to create a loss and damage fund. A popular example is the air fare levy that passengers can be made to pay when buying tickets. How can governments and airlines contribute to the setting up of a fund that can be utilized for funding for loss and damage.

The discussion is aimed at finding creative ways to a loss and damage fund. The session will answer the following questions.

1. What creative ways can activists, governments and NGOs call for to create a fund for loss and damage. Mapping out the industries that can be made to pay for the loss and damage fund 2. How much finance can such initiatives contribute to for the loss and damage fund
3. Likely challenges and ways to tackle establish those challenges

11:45-1:15

Bangladesh has achieved substantial economic growth over the last decade, establishing itself as a country with significant development potential. Bangladesh understands the necessity for major industrialisation to fulfill its aim of transitioning from a least developed nation to a high-income country by 2041. However, this expansion must be sustainable and conscious of the impact on tax/duty levies and worldwide market competitiveness. The current strong reliance on a single industry (readymade garment sector), along with rising energy demands, necessitates a diversification of industries with innovation and a comprehensive energy plan. Furthermore, the country’s commitment to combating climate change necessitates a greater emphasis on renewable energy usage. In this perspective, incorporating the shift from a traditional energy source to renewable sources is of paramount importance.

The objective of this roundtable is to bring together industry actors and key stakeholders from different industrial sectors, government bodies, academia, development sector, and technology experts to explore and strategize ways to promote sustainable industrial growth in Bangladesh through increased renewable energy integration as an innovative way to shift from traditional fossil fuel use.

1:15-2:15

Lunch

2:15-3:30

Toward a common conceptual framework: how climate change, poverty, and mental health tangle together?

 Climate change exacerbates poverty and many social and environmental risk factors for human mental health problems. Climate change acts as an amplifier for both poverty and the worsening mental health situation across the globe. Climate change impacts, including shifting weather patterns, sea level rise, and extreme weather events, are directly affecting people’s livelihoods and pushing them further into poverty. Climate change disproportionately affects the poor and the most vulnerable, especially in lower-income countries. By 2030, an estimated 100 million people are projected to fall into poverty due to climate change and its associated impacts. In recent times, mental health crisis have emerged as yet another outcome of the global climate crisis. The IPCC has noted that the rapidly worsening climate crisis poses a growing threat to mental health and psychological well-being. However, the scientific exploration of the link between climate change and mental health is a relatively new area of interest, with most discussions falling within the health frameworks of emergency and disaster management. There is a growing call for further exploration beyond the health framework to mainstream the mental health crisis within the broader context of socioeconomic and climate change actions.

Initial scoping research findings indicate that communities attribute their mental health problems to challenging immediate economic conditions caused by extreme weather events, such as flash floods, erratic rainfall, heatwaves, and salinity intrusion, among others. Communities perceive the mental health burden as a direct outcome of the sudden disruption in their livelihoods.  These initial findings align with the limitation of solely using a health framework for emergency and disaster management response, particularly in the context of rapid-onset climate disasters. It often undermines the critical causal link among climate change, poverty, and mental well-being.

The goal of this session is to critically analysis the complex relationship among climate change, poverty and health and pave a way forward to developing a conceptual framework that encompasses climate change, poverty and mental health challenges into a single analytical framework.

This session will be divided into three sub sessions, each sub session will be focused on specific outcome leading to the development of the conceptual framework on climate change, poverty and mental health. 



3:30-3:45

Tea Break

3:45-5:00

Toward a common conceptual framework: how climate change, poverty, and mental health tangle together?

 Climate change exacerbates poverty and many social and environmental risk factors for human mental health problems. Climate change acts as an amplifier for both poverty and the worsening mental health situation across the globe. Climate change impacts, including shifting weather patterns, sea level rise, and extreme weather events, are directly affecting people’s livelihoods and pushing them further into poverty. Climate change disproportionately affects the poor and the most vulnerable, especially in lower-income countries. By 2030, an estimated 100 million people are projected to fall into poverty due to climate change and its associated impacts. In recent times, mental health crisis have emerged as yet another outcome of the global climate crisis. The IPCC has noted that the rapidly worsening climate crisis poses a growing threat to mental health and psychological well-being. However, the scientific exploration of the link between climate change and mental health is a relatively new area of interest, with most discussions falling within the health frameworks of emergency and disaster management. There is a growing call for further exploration beyond the health framework to mainstream the mental health crisis within the broader context of socioeconomic and climate change actions.

Initial scoping research findings indicate that communities attribute their mental health problems to challenging immediate economic conditions caused by extreme weather events, such as flash floods, erratic rainfall, heatwaves, and salinity intrusion, among others. Communities perceive the mental health burden as a direct outcome of the sudden disruption in their livelihoods.  These initial findings align with the limitation of solely using a health framework for emergency and disaster management response, particularly in the context of rapid-onset climate disasters. It often undermines the critical causal link among climate change, poverty, and mental well-being.

The goal of this session is to critically analysis the complex relationship among climate change, poverty and health and pave a way forward to developing a conceptual framework that encompasses climate change, poverty and mental health challenges into a single analytical framework.

This session will be divided into three sub sessions, each sub session will be focused on specific outcome leading to the development of the conceptual framework on climate change, poverty and mental health. 

 

9:30-10:00

Registration

10:00-11:30

As a signatory of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Bangladesh embraced the blue
economy idea with the ocean as providing ‘development spaces’. However, in the face of an accelerating
environmental crisis along with dwindling coastal and marine resources, and deteriorating climate and
social inequalities in Bangladesh, the concepts of ‘blue growth’ and ‘blue justice’ have also emerged in
coastal and marine resource management and ocean governance. If potentials from coastal and marine
resources are to be sustainably accessible, blue growth calls for blue justice, and, in particular, socially
just and environmentally sustainable ocean harvesting is required. This session of the 6 th CSD conference
offers recent observations and research findings on local resource-users’ discourses including the voices
of marginalized women, and on the perceptions of blue governance networks and international sustainable
financing into these intertwined themes in a comprehensive way with a way forward thought.


Whether Blue Growth is ecologically sustainable needs to be carefully assessed. What is clear,
however, is that ocean equity (or socially just ocean use, and governance) is central if blue growth is to be
viable. Blue justice needs to address historical injustice by adopting a comprehensive consideration of
marginalized people in decision-making. This session asks:


   – What are the conflicts and trade-offs between ocean-based economic growth, and environmental and
     social sustainability and how can these be taken into account in equitable Blue Economy
     development?
   – How can we promote equity-focused ocean policy frameworks and governance mechanisms?
   – Which roles can be played by collaboration, education, and research to ensure blue justice?


This session provides a platform for stakeholders from government, non-government, supranational
organizations, academics and researchers, civil society, and private sectors to access very recent scientific
results and to collaboratively brainstorm in an inter- and transdisciplinary debate that is informed by and
expert insights in terms of how to support a transformative drive towards sustainable harvesting and
protection of the ocean in Bangladesh.

11:30-11:45

Tea Break

11:45 – 01:15

Strongly anchored in local communities, small-scale fisheries reflect a way of life, and they provide critical contributions to society, economy, culture and environment. Yet, their multiple benefits and contributions are often overlooked as many SSF communities remain economically and politically marginalised, are highly vulnerable to change, and until recently, remained largely invisible in policy debates in most countries and internationally. These factors, together with increasing vulnerability due to climate, environmental, economic and policy drivers have contributed to an emerging global crisis in small-scale fisheries. However, the survivability of many small-scale fisheries suggests they possess certain strengths and forms of resilience which remain less studied and poorly understood. While these strengths cannot be taken for granted, a holistic understanding of what causes vulnerability and what makes small-scale-fisheries viable is required.

The goal of the panel is to critically examine the diverse factors and conditions contributing to the vulnerability of small-scale fisheries, and to reflect on ways that are crucial to enhance their viability. We use the terms vulnerability and viability not just in an economic sense but also to include social, political, and ecological aspects of small-scale fisheries. Just as it is possible for communities to move from vulnerability conditions toward situations of viability, a process in which they can revert back to forms of vulnerability from being viable is possible. It is important to examine and understand this multidimensional and multidirectional nature of how small-scale fisheries communities move between being vulnerable and viable in the pursuit of resilient and sustainable fishery social-ecological systems. In this panel session, researchers from the V2V Global Partnership in Asia, representing Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand, will present country-specific detailed case studies focusing on the key dimensions and directions on how small-scale fisheries communities are transitioning between vulnerability and viability. Synthesis of the insights gained from the session will help in further characterising vulnerability to viability transition processes and possible pathways. An introductory paper will be presented by the session organisers. The session will emphasise that while small-scale fisheries will continue to remain vulnerable to multiple challenges, building on their existing strengths may be an effective strategy to increase viability.

1:15- 2:00

Lunch

2:00 – 3:30

Strongly anchored in local communities, small-scale fisheries reflect a way of life, and they provide critical contributions to society, economy, culture and environment. Yet, their multiple benefits and contributions are often overlooked as many SSF communities remain economically and politically marginalised, are highly vulnerable to change, and until recently, remained largely invisible in policy debates in most countries and internationally. These factors, together with increasing vulnerability due to climate, environmental, economic and policy drivers have contributed to an emerging global crisis in small-scale fisheries. However, the survivability of many small-scale fisheries suggests they possess certain strengths and forms of resilience which remain less studied and poorly understood. While these strengths cannot be taken for granted, a holistic understanding of what causes vulnerability and what makes small-scale-fisheries viable is required.

The goal of the panel is to critically examine the diverse factors and conditions contributing to the vulnerability of small-scale fisheries, and to reflect on ways that are crucial to enhance their viability. We use the terms vulnerability and viability not just in an economic sense but also to include social, political, and ecological aspects of small-scale fisheries. Just as it is possible for communities to move from vulnerability conditions toward situations of viability, a process in which they can revert back to forms of vulnerability from being viable is possible. It is important to examine and understand this multidimensional and multidirectional nature of how small-scale fisheries communities move between being vulnerable and viable in the pursuit of resilient and sustainable fishery social-ecological systems. In this panel session, researchers from the V2V Global Partnership in Asia, representing Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand, will present country-specific detailed case studies focusing on the key dimensions and directions on how small-scale fisheries communities are transitioning between vulnerability and viability. Synthesis of the insights gained from the session will help in further characterising vulnerability to viability transition processes and possible pathways. An introductory paper will be presented by the session organisers. The session will emphasise that while small-scale fisheries will continue to remain vulnerable to multiple challenges, building on their existing strengths may be an effective strategy to increase viability.

2:00-4:00

Organising a visual storytelling competition on SDGs among the students of ULAB will serve as an opportunity for the students to channel their creativity and passion (outside of their textbook) towards a purposeful cause. Visual storytelling holds the ability to transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, conveying complex messages with simplicity and impact. Through the lens of visual storytelling, the students can explore and express their understanding of complex global challenges, devise innovative solutions, and communicate their ideas effectively to a broader audience.

Hosting competitions related to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will act as a vital initiative for ULAB. This competition will offer a platform for students of ULAB to engage with some of the most pressing global challenges of the time. At the same time, the audience will have access to a visual representation of how SDGs can be portrayed through visual and creative storytelling processes. Altogether, this competition will empower students and the participants to become change-makers and equip them with the skills and motivation needed to create a sustainable and equitable future.

3:30-3:45

Tea Break

3:45- 5:00

Transboundary Exploration – Bangladesh-India Sundarban Region Cooperation Initiative

9:30-11:15

Education is considered to be one of the most influential tools that can shape our future world. Bangladesh’s educational institutions are incorporating sustainability education into their teaching plans at all levels. By integrating sustainability or environmental education into the curricula, students will not only gain knowledge and awareness but also skills that will help them translate their knowledge into action. Sustainability education teaches students empathy, responsibility, and accountability for their actions which is essential for them to make informed choices to develop a future that supports ecological, human, and economic security. It remains crucial to understand how this knowledge is taught in kindergartens, schools, and universities. This can be done by looking into the frameworks the educators are using, methods of engaging students in their lessons, outreach programs, and activities beyond the classroom.

The positive contribution of knowledge, skills, and empathy to create a sustainable society has been studied by many researchers. A recent study conducted by CSD highlighted the role of empathetic skills in influencing sustainable behavior among individuals. The key results from this study highlight how education can support the development of empathic skills and leadership through education can build a more sustainable society, which will contribute positively toward a sustainable world.

This round-table discussion will aim to address the key issues on the role of education (at all levels) in mainstreaming sustainability in society through education. It will aim to answer the questions:
1. What is the ideal education curriculum/system that will result in sustainable behavior in the future?
2. How can sustainability education/SDGs be incorporated into the curricula?
3. Are the current practices effective? What are the challenges and scopes for improvement?

These questions will help identify the current state of sustainability education in Bangladesh and start a dialogue on how to move forward collectively for effective changes for a sustainable future.

11:15-11:30

Tea Break

11:30-1:30

Climate adaptation remains a top priority for a climate-vulnerable country like Bangladesh. Despite the progress, turning policies into actions still requires more focus and effort as Bangladesh demands that its economy become a low-carbon, green economy to combat the challenges of climate change. To assist the transition to a green economy, Bangladesh’s education and skill-development systems must be reoriented to match the growing need for job-related green skills.

Universities as centers of learning and innovation play a critical role in building lasting climate-related capacities around the world. To support climate-affected populations in Bangladesh, a more climate-sensitive workforce is needed by upskilling students, practitioners, and communities. As a first step to prioritizing and assessing the gaps, the employers will need to map and identify core competencies required such as green skills, adaptation processes, locally-led solutions, and fundamental managerial, technical, and foundational skills.

This interactive workshop aims to brainstorm with key stakeholders such as NGOs, academics, civil society actors, policy influencers, and the Government to co-design and co-develop innovative, practice-based, and contextualized curricula, training materials, and guides for green skills and climate adaptation. 

11:30-1:00

This storytelling workshop will explore the interconnectedness among flood risks, associated human sufferings, and societies’ never-ending attempts to find solutions to fight inundation. Appreciating the tangled relationship between human and nature, the invited panelists and the audience will share personal examples of flood risks and uncertainties; diverse methods of flood risk management, including nature-based solutions; opportunities for community and youth engagement in them; and challenges around monitoring and evaluation, both in rural and urban contexts. This facilitated discussion will create a foundation for a community of practice to take the conversation forward. We encourage the participants to have access to relevant photographs to share during the session.

1:30 – 2:30

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Direction to the Conference Venue

688 Beribadh Road
Mohammadpur
Dhaka – 1207, Bangladesh