October - 28

9:30 - 10:00

Registration

10:00-11:30

Conference Convenor:

Prof. Samiya Selim

Director, CSD, University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh. 

Welcome Speech:

Professor Kaiser Hamidul Haque

Dean of School of Arts and Humanities, ULAB

Special Guest:

Dr. Kazi Anis Ahmed

Board of Trustee, ULAB

Special Guest:

Prof. Saleemul Huq

Director, International Center for Climate Change and Development.

Special Guest:

Corinne Henchoz Pignani

Deputy Head of Corporation, Embassy of Switzerland

Keynote Speaker:

Prof. Dr. Ahmad Kamruzzaman Majumder

Dean, Faculty of Science Stamford University Bangladesh ; Founding Chairman, Center for Atmospheric Pollution Studies

Chief Guest: 

Engr. Mohammad Hossain

Director General, Power Cell, Ministry Of Power Energy and Mineral Resources

11:30-11:45

Tea Break

11:45-1:15

Establishing a loss and damage fund has, however, been very challenging. Less than 100 days left before COP 28 begins in Dubai. The Transitional Committee set up by the UNFCCC is tasked with coming up with ways to establish a loss and damage fund.
This session will look into other creative methods that can be used to create a loss and damage fund. The session will explore innovative funding mechanisms such as the International Air Passenger Levy, Bunker Fuel Levy, Windfall taxes on fossil fuel companies to contribute to the setting up of a fund that can be utilized for funding for loss and damage.

The session will thus aim to discuss innovative funding mechanism to create a loss and damage fund. The session will answer the following questions.

1. What creative ways can activists, governments and NGOs call for to create a fund for loss and damage.          Mapping out the industries that can be made to pay for the loss and damage fund. 
2. How much finance can such initiatives contribute to for the loss and damage fund.
3. Likely challenges and ways to tackle establish those challenges.

11:45-1:15

Bangladesh has achieved substantial economic growth over the last decade, establishing itself as a country with significant development potential. Bangladesh understands the necessity for major industrialisation to fulfill its aim of transitioning from a least developed nation to a high-income country by 2041. However, this expansion must be sustainable and conscious of the impact on tax/duty levies and worldwide market competitiveness. The current strong reliance on a single industry (readymade garment sector), along with rising energy demands, necessitates a diversification of industries with innovation and a comprehensive energy plan. Furthermore, the country’s commitment to combating climate change necessitates a greater emphasis on renewable energy usage. In this perspective, incorporating the shift from a traditional energy source to renewable sources is of paramount importance.

The objective of this roundtable is to bring together industry actors and key stakeholders from different industrial sectors, government bodies, academia, development sector, and technology experts to explore and strategize ways to promote sustainable industrial growth in Bangladesh through increased renewable energy integration as an innovative way to shift from traditional fossil fuel use.

1:15-2:15

Lunch

2:15-3:30

Toward a common conceptual framework: how climate change, poverty, and mental health tangle together?

 Climate change exacerbates poverty and many social and environmental risk factors for human mental health problems. Climate change acts as an amplifier for both poverty and the worsening mental health situation across the globe. Climate change impacts, including shifting weather patterns, sea level rise, and extreme weather events, are directly affecting people's livelihoods and pushing them further into poverty. Climate change disproportionately affects the poor and the most vulnerable, especially in lower-income countries. By 2030, an estimated 100 million people are projected to fall into poverty due to climate change and its associated impacts. In recent times, mental health crisis have emerged as yet another outcome of the global climate crisis. The IPCC has noted that the rapidly worsening climate crisis poses a growing threat to mental health and psychological well-being. However, the scientific exploration of the link between climate change and mental health is a relatively new area of interest, with most discussions falling within the health frameworks of emergency and disaster management. There is a growing call for further exploration beyond the health framework to mainstream the mental health crisis within the broader context of socioeconomic and climate change actions.

Initial scoping research findings indicate that communities attribute their mental health problems to challenging immediate economic conditions caused by extreme weather events, such as flash floods, erratic rainfall, heatwaves, and salinity intrusion, among others. Communities perceive the mental health burden as a direct outcome of the sudden disruption in their livelihoods.  These initial findings align with the limitation of solely using a health framework for emergency and disaster management response, particularly in the context of rapid-onset climate disasters. It often undermines the critical causal link among climate change, poverty, and mental well-being.

The goal of this session is to critically analysis the complex relationship among climate change, poverty and health and pave a way forward to developing a conceptual framework that encompasses climate change, poverty and mental health challenges into a single analytical framework.

This session will be divided into three sub sessions, each sub session will be focused on specific outcome leading to the development of the conceptual framework on climate change, poverty and mental health. 



3:30-3:45

Tea Break

3:45-5:00

Toward a common conceptual framework: how climate change, poverty, and mental health tangle together?

 Climate change exacerbates poverty and many social and environmental risk factors for human mental health problems. Climate change acts as an amplifier for both poverty and the worsening mental health situation across the globe. Climate change impacts, including shifting weather patterns, sea level rise, and extreme weather events, are directly affecting people's livelihoods and pushing them further into poverty. Climate change disproportionately affects the poor and the most vulnerable, especially in lower-income countries. By 2030, an estimated 100 million people are projected to fall into poverty due to climate change and its associated impacts. In recent times, mental health crisis have emerged as yet another outcome of the global climate crisis. The IPCC has noted that the rapidly worsening climate crisis poses a growing threat to mental health and psychological well-being. However, the scientific exploration of the link between climate change and mental health is a relatively new area of interest, with most discussions falling within the health frameworks of emergency and disaster management. There is a growing call for further exploration beyond the health framework to mainstream the mental health crisis within the broader context of socioeconomic and climate change actions.

Initial scoping research findings indicate that communities attribute their mental health problems to challenging immediate economic conditions caused by extreme weather events, such as flash floods, erratic rainfall, heatwaves, and salinity intrusion, among others. Communities perceive the mental health burden as a direct outcome of the sudden disruption in their livelihoods.  These initial findings align with the limitation of solely using a health framework for emergency and disaster management response, particularly in the context of rapid-onset climate disasters. It often undermines the critical causal link among climate change, poverty, and mental well-being.

The goal of this session is to critically analysis the complex relationship among climate change, poverty and health and pave a way forward to developing a conceptual framework that encompasses climate change, poverty and mental health challenges into a single analytical framework.

This session will be divided into three sub sessions, each sub session will be focused on specific outcome leading to the development of the conceptual framework on climate change, poverty and mental health.